Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce, organic produce delivery, tips & tricks, Uncategorized.

Hello All and Happy Friday!

This week’s menu is full of treats perfect to warm up the crisp Autumn air. For the first time, we’ll be having Napa Cabbage (a.k.a. Celery Cabbage). It looks a little bit like iceberg lettuce in color and is somewhat rubbery to touch. This leafy looking cabbage is often used in East Asian recipes, but is a great substitute for just about any cabbage dish. Plus, it’s full of nutrients! One cup of raw Napa Cabbage provides half of your day’s vitamins A and C needs, as well as one gram of fiber and one gram of protein. It is also really low in calories, so keep the bowls comin’!

A little history: The name “napa” comes from colloquial and regional Japanese, where nappa refers to the leaves of any vegetable, especially when used as food. The Japanese name for this specific variety of cabbage is hakusai, lit “white vegetable”, a cognate of the Chinese name. Napa Cabbage is widely used in China, Japan, and Korea. Because of immigrants from these nations, it is also readily found in many North American, European and Australian cities. The flavor has been described by some as delicate compared to bok choy or cabbage.

How to use it: Napa Cabbage can be used in many different ways. It is great as slaw or a lettuce substitute in salads. We did a little research and found this great site with different Napa Cabbage recipes, including the GGO featured recipe of the week!

How will you be using your Napa Cabbage next week? We would love to hear! Share your recipes, ideas and tips on our Facebook page! Also, stay up-to-date with all things GGO on Twitter!

Have a great weekend everyone! As always, if you have any questions or need to get in touch with us, the best way to reach us is via e-mail at hello(at)goldengateorganics.com. We love to talk 🙂

Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce delivery, produce report, weekly update.

Hello all and Happy Delivery Day!

Hopefully you aren’t too tired from last night’s festivities. If so, munch on some of your GGO items from your box for some natural energy! Speaking of this week’s produce, we had a last minute change that was not reflective of the menu posted online. No worries, the produce was still great and the change wasn’t too bad…

Rather than butternut squash, we received acorn squash. Acorn squash is a little smaller than butternut, but is still great to cook with! We’ve had this item before and we have a great recipe for it!

Everything else looked really good this week! The tomatoes and cabbage are larger than expected! We suggest eating the bananas in the next couple of days as they are just ripe. The kale is awesome! The leaves are huge and crisp. The kiwi are sweet and delicious. This week’s box is definitely a treat.

Do you have any special plans for this week’s box? If so, we’d love to hear about them! Share your tips, tricks, recipes and ideas on our Facebook page! Also, be sure to follow us on Twitter for the latest on all things GGO and organic. As always, feel free to contact us if you have any questions! We love to talk 🙂

Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce delivery, tips & tricks.

Happy Friday Everyone!

You may have noticed that this week lettuce was not included on the menu for the first time in GGO history. We thought we’d take a break and add cabbage as a hearty substitute. The great thing about cabbage is that it makes for a delicious healthy salad, or can be cooked into a sweet and savory side dish. Regardless of how you use it, cabbage is a great choice for any meal!

It is one of the richest when it comes to protective vitamins. It is a good supplier of vitamins A, B, C and E, potassium and fiber. Cabbage has also been found to lower the risk of cancer of the colon.  Cabbage kills bacteria and viruses in the lab and boosts the immune system to produce more antibodies. All-in-all, it’s a pretty rockin’ veggie!

In other news: Halloween is days away and we wanted to take this opportunity to share delicious, healthy organic sweet substitutes for candy’s favorite holiday. Some tips and tricks include Vegan Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups, Organic Root Beer Barrels, and Baby Carrots. For a full list of yummy organic Halloween treats, click here.

Also, be sure to enter our Jack-o-lantern contest on Facebook! Share your a photo of your carved pumpkin on our wall and you could win a FREE box of strawberries in this week’s delivery! You have until Monday at noon to upload your photo. The GGO team will pick the winner.

If you have any questions, as always, feel free to contact us! We love to talk! 🙂 Have a good weekend and a safe and happy Halloween!

Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce, organic produce delivery, produce report, tips & tricks, Uncategorized.

Happy Delivery Day Everyone!

The produce looked beautiful and bright this morning! We are so lucky to have pomegranates this week! They came in looking gorgeous and ready to eat. Pomegranates are a great source of vitamins C and B and potassium. For those of you who eat the pomegranates edible seeds, you get a high source of fiber and unsaturated oils. They are perfect for snacking and juicing. Just don’t get its juice on your clothes, it stains!

We suggest eating the bananas within the next couple of days. They are ripe! A good way of extending the shelf life of a banana is by putting the in the fridge. The skin will turn a dark brown relatively fast, but no worries! The bananas will stay ripe, fresh and ready to eat for much longer than being on the counter.

The spaghetti squash came in awesome and big! The persimmons looked fantastic. All around, today’s produce was issue-free! 🙂

We would love to hear how you’ll be using your produce items this week! Feel free to share your recipes, tips and tricks on our Facebook page! Feel free to contact us with any questions or comments! We love to talk 🙂

Posted by & filed under delivery, gdgat, organic produce, tips & tricks.

Hello All and Happy Friday!

We are so exited that it is Autumn and we can have squash each week! This week, we will be having spaghetti squash. Spaghetti squash is an oblong, mildly flavored yellow squash whose flesh separates into spaghetti-like strands when you cook it and run a fork through it.

This squash is great because it can be cooked in so many different ways. For example, it is a great substitute for pasta dishes or it can be baked and served as a side dish. Spaghetti squash can be baked, boiled, steamed, or even microwaved (such as in this week’s featured recipe)! Another great perk about spaghetti squash: the seeds can be roasted, similar to pumpkin seeds. Yumm!!

Spaghetti squash is high in nutritional value, too! It has a high water content and is not as dense in vitamins and minerals as other squash, such as acorn or butternut, but does provide 3 percent of the Daily Value for calcium, 5 percent of the DV for Vitamin A, 9 percent of the DV for Vitamin C and 8 percent of the DV for dietary fiber. It is also low in calories and carbohydrates! What a treat!

How will you be using your spaghetti squash? We would love to hear! Share your comments, recipes, stories and photos on our Facebook page!

Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce delivery, produce report, tips & tricks, weekly update.

Hello all and Happy Delivery Day!

As always the produce looked great this morning. This week was one of our most varied in produce items. We hope you all enjoy it and would love to hear some feedback!

This week’s boxes are especially awesome because we have fall squash (finally), persimmons and pineapple! YUMMM! The butternut squash are nearly the same size as the pineapple! And we cannot wait to hear how you will be using them. We found some great and healthy recipes perfect for any occasion and palate!

The pineapple are sure to be a treat. If you’ve never cut a fresh pineapple before, it may be a little intimidating. But no worries, we’ve got the How To for you! You’ll need a sharp knife and a peeler. First, you want to cut the top (leaves) and bottom off. Second, keeping it standing upright, hold the top and cut the peel away from the top down. Don’t worry about the little “eyes” leftover; use the peeler to get rid of any unwanted “eyes.” Finally, slice or chop the pineapple to your liking.

Some pineapple insight: Pineapple is high in manganese, a mineral that is critical to development of strong bones and connective tissue. A cup of fresh pineapple will give you nearly 75% of the recommended daily amount. It is particularly helpful to older adults, whose bones tend to become brittle with age.

We are also very excited about persimmons! Be sure to check out our produce spotlight on this ye olde fruit from last Friday’s blog post.

The rest of the produce is also very exciting! The oranges and grapefruit are delicious. The carrots and the rainbow chard are absolutely beautiful! We recommend eating the romaine lettuce within the next couple of days. It wasn’t our best quality, but it is still good to eat and yummy! We have notified the supplier. The bananas are a little green again this week. Like before, we suggest leaving them on the counter for a couple of days or in a brown bag with an apple overnight for speedy ripening.

Feel free to share your tips, recipes, questions and/or concerns on our Facebook page! Have something urgent? Contact us directly via e-mail and we will be sure to get back to you ASAP. We love to talk! 🙂

Posted by & filed under fruit, gdgat, organic produce delivery, tips & tricks.

Hello All! This Tuesday’s deliveries will include the Persimmon. Originally from China, the persimmon came to the United States in the 1800s and today is grown rapidly throughout California. This brightly colored, glossy orange red skinned fruit is an excellent source of vitamin A, a good source of vitamin C, and rich in fiber.

Ripen persimmons at room temperature in a paper bag with an apple or banana. Store them in the refrigerator when ripe. Be sure to eat the fruit as soon as possible because overripe persimmons quickly turn to a mushy texture.

Recipe:

Persimmon and Apple Salad
Makes 6 servings
Each serving equals 1/2 cup of fruit or vegetables

Ingredients

1 Tbsp walnut pieces, toasted
2 Tbsp orange juice
1 Tbsp sherry vinegar
1 Tbsp olive oil
3 sweet variety apples, rinsed, cored, and thinly sliced lengthwise
3 firm-ripe persimmons, rinsed, stemmed, and thinly sliced lengthwise

In a bowl, combine orange juice, vinegar, and olive oil. Add apples, persimmons, and toasted walnuts and mix to coat.

Nutritional analysis per serving: Calories 90, Protein 0g, Fat 3g, Calories From Fat 29%, Cholesterol 0mg, Carbohydrates 16g, Fiber 3g, Sodium 15mg.

Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce, organic produce delivery, tips & tricks, Uncategorized.

Hello All and Happy Friday!

We’ve received many e-mails since getting started asking for tips on ripening produce or extending shelf life. Fresh organic produce perishes much faster than conventional. Since there aren’t any added preservatives or pesticides, most of the produce will not last longer than a week. In some cases, without proper care, fresh organic produce can perish within a couple of days.

But fear no more, GGO faithfuls! We’ve gathered the best tips for storing the most common fruits and veggies. Follow these tips and you’ll surely extend the shelf life of your organic goodies.

Veggies

  • Broccoli: Keep refrigerated (32–36°F / 0–2°C). Sprinkle with water and store in a plastic bag to avoid dehydration. Wash thoroughly and trim away any damage or bruises before using. Discard broccoli that looks wilted, bends easily, or smells bad.
  • Carrots: Keep refrigerated (32–36°F / 0–2°C). Remove tops, rinse, and store in a plastic bag to avoid dehydration. Wash thoroughly and use a vegetable brush to remove surface dirt. Cut away any damage or bruises before using. Discard carrots that feel soft or smell bad.
  • Lettuce: Keep heads of lettuce refrigerated (32–36°F / 0–2°C), away from fruits to avoid deterioration and transfer of off-flavors. Wash thoroughly and cut away any damage or bruises before use. Discard leaves that look slimy, discolored, or wilted, or that smell bad.
  • Celery: Keep refrigerated (32–36°F / 0–2°C). Wash thoroughly and use a vegetable brush to remove surface dirt. Trim and store in a plastic bag. Cut away any damage or bruises before using. Discard celery with cracks, soft or wilted ribs, or a bad smell.
  • Garlic: Store whole heads of garlic in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place (45–50°F / 7–10°C), but do not refrigerate whole garlic. Store away from other foods that may pick up its taste. Peel the papery husk from each clove and cut away any damage or bruises before using. Discard garlic that has sprouted, shows signs of moisture, rot, or mildew, or smells bad. Always refrigerate peeled or cut garlic in a tightly sealed container.
  • Onions: Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place (55–65°F / 13–18°C) away from potatoes (potatoes will absorb onions’ moisture and deteriorate faster). Peel and rinse thoroughly, then cut away minor bruises or damage before before use. Discard onions that have sprouted, show signs of rot or mildew, feel soft, or smell bad. Always refrigerate cut onions in a tightly sealed container.
  • Potatoes: Store whole potatoes in a cool, dry, dark place (45–50°F / 7–10°C) with good ventilation, but do not refrigerate. Wash thoroughly and scrub vigorously with a good vegetable brush to remove surface dirt before use. Cut away any damage, bruises, or sprouts. Green discoloration just under the skin can be trimmed away, but discard potatoes with green extending into the flesh, soft spots, or an unpleasant odor.

Fruits

  • Apples: Always keep them refrigerated (32–36°F / 0–2°C). Discard any cut fruit that has passed its “use by” date, feels mushy, or smells bad. Store whole apples away from greens, onions, meat, eggs, and dairy products to avoid transfer of odors. Wash them thoroughly and cut away any damage or bruises before using. Discard apples that feel soft, look wilted, or smell bad.
  • Grapes: Keep refrigerated (32–36°F / 0–2°C) in a sealed plastic bag to avoid transfer of off-flavors, and consume promptly. Do not wash until ready to use, then rinse thoroughly. A slight powdery appearance on the skin (“bloom”) is natural and harmless. Discard grapes that look bruised, feel mushy, or smell bad.
  • Oranges: Store whole oranges in a cool, dry place (45–50°F / 7–10°C). Wash before using, even if you plan to peel them. Discard oranges with bruised or shriveled areas, mold on the skin, soft or spongy spots, or a bad smell. Always refrigerate cut oranges
  • Avocados: Ripen whole avocados in a paper bag or a warm spot in the kitchen; when fully ripe, whole avocados can be stored in a cool, dry place (45–55°F / 7–13°C). Store away from other fruits to avoid over-ripening them. Wash thoroughly before peeling and cut away any damage or bruises before use. Ripe avocados yield readily to gentle pressure, but discard avocados that feel very mushy, look damaged, or smell bad. Always refrigerate cut avocados; leave the pit in or sprinkle it with a little lemon juice to help keep the flesh from turning brown.
  • Peaches: Keep whole, unripe peaches in a paper bag at room temperature (55–70°F / 13–21°C) until ripe, then refrigerate (32–36°F / 0–2°C) and consume within 2–4 days. Store away from other fruits to avoid over-ripening. Ripe peaches have a pleasant, peachy fragrance. Wash thoroughly and cut away any damage or bruises before use. Discard any shriveled fruit or peaches with mushy spots, large bruises, or a bad odor. Always refrigerate cut peaches.
  • Strawberries: Remove from their original container and store in the coldest part of the refrigerator (32–36°F / 0–2°C), loosely covered with plastic wrap. Use promptly, within 1–3 days. Do not wash until ready to use, then wash thoroughly with the caps on, trimming later if desired. Allowing berries to reach room temperature just before using can improve their flavor. Discard berries with wilted caps, brown spots or large bruises, and do not use berries that are discolored, mushy, or smell bad.
  • Tomatoes: Keep unripe tomatoes in a paper bag at room temperature (55–70°F / 13–21°C) until ripe, and store ripe tomatoes at room temperature. Wash thoroughly and cut away any damaged or bruised areas before using. Discard tomatoes that are mushy or split, appear wilted, look discolored, or smell bad. Never refrigerate whole tomatoes, but always refrigerate cut tomatoes.

tips courtesy of ebfarm.com

Posted by & filed under delivery, gdgat, organic produce, organic produce delivery, produce report, tips & tricks.

Hello all and Happy Delivery Day!

Today’s produce was delicious and beautiful this morning, but not quite what we’ve been used to. We truly apologize for any let down. As you may know, organic produce can be extremely unpredictable. However, we were very sad when we saw the size of the carrots this morning. They are delicious and perfect to eat, but quite smaller than the usual. We suggest adding them to a salad, dipping them into your favorite dressing, or adding them to soup. They are the perfect bite size. We promise to continue our pledge to find the best possible organic produce in the area.

The bananas were quite green this morning. We suggest letting them ripen on the counter for a couple of days. If you’re looking to expedite the process, leave them in a brown paper bag with an apple. Once they are ripe, place them in the fridge to extend shelf life. Their skin will turn a dark brown, but they will remain delicious inside.

Also, we know it is quite wet outside. Our delivery drivers are stocked with bags for those of you who do not leave out a cooler.

Do you have any tips for keeping your organic produce fresh? As always, we’d love to hear it! Feel free to share all of your tips, recipes and thoughts about organic produce on our Facebook page!

If you have any questions at all, don’t hesitate to contact us and we will get back to you ASAP. We love to talk! 🙂

Posted by & filed under gdgat, organic produce delivery, tips & tricks, weekly update.

This week’s menu includes the spicy Jalapeno pepper. The Jalapeno is one of the most commonly grown chiles in Mexico and probably the most common chile pepper in the U.S. When the jalapeno is smoked and dried it is called a “chipotle”.

The name “jalapeno” is derived from “Jalapa” the capitol of Veracruz, Mexico. The chiles average 2″ to 2 1/2″ in length and about 1″ in diameter.

The use of this chile dates back to the Aztecs who were the first known to smoke the chiles. Jalapenos are so thick and fleshy that they can’t be dried to preserve them because they’ll rot before they will dry.

So how are you going to use this spicy addition to your meals? Be sure to see our recipe this week for a Tomato and Apple Salsa. You can also check out five great and innovative ways to use Jalapenos.  Share your ideas, tips and recipes for all of this week’s items on our Facebook page!

Have a great weekend! 🙂